Bollywood Finance Sports Technology Andhra Tamilnadu Karnataka Kerala  
search
Tech Home

Computers world software news and magazine

Computers world software news and magazine - Software News  

Software News



Computerworld - IT news, features, blogs, tech reviews, career advice
Share    
    Facebook reveals the logic behind its forced Messenger split
    Facebook annoyed and puzzled many people last year when it forced them to download its Messenger app for chats. Its reasons for doing so are now clearer: Messenger is becoming a beast of an app, with its own links to outside businesses and software apart from Facebook's main site. At the company's F8 developer conference this week in San Francisco, executives pulled back the curtain on the new Messenger. It's now a storefront and a platform for other mobile apps, which can be downloaded from within Messenger and integrated into people's Messenger chats. There are more than 40 outside app partners already aiming to spice up users' conversations with things like personalized GIFs, tools to turn your texts into songs, and even sports animations from ESPN. The apps can be accessed by hitting the "..." button on the Messenger compose screen.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    FCC will vote next month on plan to share valuable 3.5GHz spectrum
    The U.S. Federal Communications Commission will vote April 17 on a spectrum-sharing plan for a band that could serve the military, mobile service providers and individuals. The CBRS (Citizens Broadband Radio Service) would open up frequencies from 3550-3700MHz to three classes of users, including owners of new mobile devices who could use the service like they do Wi-Fi. The FCC vote comes after several rounds of study and public comment on the proposal for more than two years. In that time, growing demand for wireless spectrum has boosted pressure on the government to share or auction off some of the many frequencies it exclusively controls. Bandwidth-hungry services like streaming video and audio, plus wireless links for a growing array of connected devices, are expected to eventually place strains on the spectrum currently allocated to wireless data.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    Why Facebook Messenger will fail as a 'platform'
    Now we know why Facebook ripped Messenger out of the mobile version of the Facebook app last April: Messenger was destined to become a "platform" in its own right, complete with an API and developer program to help and encourage software companies to make Facebook Messenger-specific apps.The way it works for users is that an interface to Messenger-specific apps appears right there in the Messenger mobile app. When an app is selected, the user is deep-linked to the phone's regular app store where the app can be downloaded.Messaging as a platform is an old idea. Asia-dominant competitors to Facebook Messenger, such as Line and WeChat, have been offering apps, eCommerce, gaming, business apps and more.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    Kleiner Perkins cleared of sex discrimination against Ellen Pao
    A jury has found mostly in favor of Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers in a historic lawsuit accusing one of Silicon Valley's best-known venture capital firms of sex discrimination. The jury found against Ellen Pao on three out of four claims, including whether her gender was a factor in Kleiner Perkins's decision not to promote her, according to reporters tweeting from the courtroom Friday. There was some confusion after the verdict was read, however, because the jury of six men and six women did not reach a sufficient majority on one question: whether Kleiner Perkins retaliated against Pao by terminating her employment after she complained that she was discriminated against.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    USB Type-C peripherals are on the way, and storage devices are first up
    With Apple's latest MacBook and Google's newest Chromebook just out and featuring the new USB Type-C connector, we're on the lookout for peripherals that use the interface, and storage devices appear to be first out of the gate.Because the Type-C connector can be used to recharge laptops, it may ultimately do away with the need to carry bulky power adapters. Like older USB technology, Type-C will also connect monitors, external storage drives, printers, cameras and other peripherals. One beauty of the system is that cables have the same connector on both ends, and can be inserted into ports without worries about which side is up or down.Storage devices will eventually benefit from Type-C's USB 3.1 protocol, which can transfer data at 10Gbps (bits per second), double that of USB 3.0. But the first peripherals we're seeing support only USB 3.0 speeds.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    Not to be outdone, Amazon unleashes unlimited storage for $5 a month
    Amazon this week laid down the gauntlet: Unlimited cloud storage for individuals for $5 a month.Amazon's Unlimited Everything Plan allows users to store an infinite number of  photos, videos, files, documents, movies and music in its Cloud Drive.The site also announced a separate $12 per year plan for unlimited photos. People who subscribe to Amazon Prime already get unlimited capacity for photos. Both the Unlimited Everything Plan and the Photos Plan have three-month free trial periods.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    Why Meerkat and Periscope are the next big challenge for marketers
    There's nothing like a brand-new medium to put marketing departments into overdrive, and it would be hard to find a better example than the recent, rapid-fire arrival of live-stream video apps Meerkat and Periscope.Meerkat fairly stole the show at this month's SXSW Interactive in Austin, Texas, where startups, brands and agencies used it to share live music performances, session videos and parties. Fast forward to this week, and Twitter -- which had already taken the preemptive step of cutting Meerkat off from its social graph -- launched Periscope, its own, recently acquired contender.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    Microsoft should forget the Surface, stick to the Pro 2-in-1 line
    Microsoft will resuscitate its Surface tablet with a new model powered by Windows 8.1, ditching the flop that was Windows RT for a lower-priced device, according to an online report.But the company would be better served by sticking with its Surface Pro line, some analysts said."A new Surface seems to be consistent with their Windows 10 story, that the OS will exist on all platforms," said Ezra Gottheil of Technology Business Research. "But that still leaves the question, 'Do they really need one of these?' I don't think so. I don't think it's a good idea."Gottheil was referring to a Wednesday report by WinBeta.com that Microsoft intends to launch a replacement for the discontinued Surface 2 tablet, a 2013 device powered by an ARM-architecture processor that ran Windows RT, a spinoff from Windows 8 that never gained traction.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    Slack hacked, compromising users' profile data
    The popular group chat tool Slack suffered a hack of its central database last month, the company admitted Friday, potentially compromising users' profile information like log-on data, email addresses and phone numbers. The database also holds any additional information users may have added to their profiles like their Skype IDs. The passwords were encrypted using a hashing technique. There was no indication the hackers were able to decrypt the passwords, Slack Technologies said in a blog post. No financial or payment information was accessed or compromised, it said.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    5 ways to use virtual reality in the enterprise
    With Facebook executives focusing so much of their annual F8 developers conference on virtual reality, people are wondering how the technology will affect gaming and social networking. But good virtual reality -- the kind that makes you feel like you're really part of an experience -- will have a huge impact on business. For enterprises trying to differentiate themselves from their competitors, trying to connect with customers, trying to better show off their products and even make potential customers feel like they're trying out everything from a new car to a new iPhone before they buy it, virtual reality is likely to be a game changer for the enterprise.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    New mobile-malware detection technique uses gestures
    Mobile malware is a growing problem, but researchers from University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) have figured out a new way of detecting when shady mobile apps get up to no good, such as trying to call premium-rate numbers unbeknowst to a phone's owner. The technique relies on using the phone's motion, position and ambient sensors to learn the gestures that users typically make when they initiate phone calls, take pictures or use the phone's NFC reader to scan credit cards. Some mobile malware programs already abuse these services and security researchers expect their number will only increase. The technology developed by the UAB researchers can monitor those three services and can check whether attempts to access them are accompanied by the natural gestures users are expected to make. If they're not, they were likely initiated by malware.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

    Congress moves quickly on cyberthreat information sharing
    Congress is moving forward quickly with legislation that would encourage private companies to share cyberthreat information with government agencies, despite concerns that two leading bills weaken consumer privacy protections. The House Intelligence Committee voted Thursday to approve the Protecting Cyber Networks Act (PCNA), just two days after the bill was introduced. The House bill "is a cybersurveillance bill at least as much as it is a cybersecurity bill, and it is written so broadly that it could wind up making the Internet less safe," Robyn Greene, policy counsel at the New America Foundation's Open Technology Institute, said by email.

    To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Next


Tags : Computers world software news and magazine, Computerworld - IT news, features, blogs, tech reviews, career advice, Computer WorldComputers world software news and magazine

Add Computers world software news and magazine to your blog or website